curriculum

anew bam Curriculum

Curriculum consultation- Around the 11 dimensions of Culturally Relevant Arts Education which are:

Culturally responsive teachers are socially and academically empowering by setting high expectations for students with a commitment to every student’s success;
• Culturally responsive teachers are multidimensional because they engage cultural knowledge, experiences, contributions, and perspectives;
• Culturally responsive teachers validate every student’s culture, bridging gaps between school and home through diversified instructional strategies and multicultural curricula;
• Culturally responsive teachers are socially, emotionally, and politically comprehensive as they seek to educate the whole child;
• Culturally responsive teachers are transformative of schools and societies by using students’ existing strengths to drive instruction, assessment, and curriculum design;
• Culturally responsive teachers are emancipatory and liberating from oppressive educational practices and ideologies as they lift “the veil of presumed absolute authority from conceptions of scholarly truth typically taught in schools.” (Gay, 2010, p. 38)
• Culturally relevant pedagogues think in terms of long-term academic achievement and not merely end-of-year tests. After later adopters of culturally relevant pedagogy began to equate student achievement with standardized test scores or scripted curricula, Ladson-Billings (2006) clarified what more accurately described her intent: “‘student learning’—what it is that students actually know and are able to do as a result of pedagogical interactions with skilled teachers” (p. 34).
• Culturally relevant pedagogues focus on cultural competence, which “refers to helping students to recognize and honor their own cultural beliefs and practices while acquiring access to the wider culture, where they are likely to have a chance of improving their socioeconomic status and making informed decisions about the lives they wish to lead” (Ladson-Billings, 2006, p. 36). Culturally relevant pedagogues understand that students must learn to navigate between home and school, and teachers must find ways to equip students with the knowledge needed to succeed in a school system that oppresses them (Delpit, 2006; Ladson-Billings, 2006; Urrieta, 2005).
• Culturally relevant pedagogies seek to develop socio political consciousness, which includes a teacher’s obligation to find ways for “students to recognize, understand, and critique current and social inequalities” (Ladson-Billings, 1995b, p. 476). Sociopolitical consciousness begins with teachers recognizing sociopolitical issues of race, class, and gender in themselves and understanding the causes before then incorporating these issues in their teaching.
Social Justice: Using the classroom is site for Social Justice.
Arts: Integrating arts in the curriculum to engage students who are struggling academically.

All consultation will facilitated by masters teachers who are familiar with the Culturally Relevant Arts Education, and proven academic and test results working with students who come from low-income neighborhoods.

curriculum audit-Curriculum audits will focus on the 11 dimensions of Culturally Relevant Arts Education which are:
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially and academically empowering by setting high expectations for students with a commitment to every student’s success;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are multidimensional because they engage cultural knowledge, experiences, contributions, and perspectives;
  • Culturally responsive teachers validate every student’s culture, bridging gaps between school and home through diversified instructional strategies and multicultural curricula;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially, emotionally, and politically comprehensive as they seek to educate the whole child;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are transformative of schools and societies by using students’ existing strengths to drive instruction, assessment, and curriculum design;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are emancipatory and liberating from oppressive educational practices and ideologies as they lift “the veil of presumed absolute authority from conceptions of scholarly truth typically taught in schools.” (Gay, 2010, p. 38)
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues think in terms of long-term academic achievement and not merely end-of-year tests. After later adopters of culturally relevant pedagogy began to equate student achievement with standardized test scores or scripted curricula, Ladson-Billings (2006) clarified what more accurately described her intent: “‘student learning’—what it is that students actually know and are able to do as a result of pedagogical interactions with skilled teachers” (p.34).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues focus on cultural competence, which “refers to helping students to recognize and honor their own cultural beliefs and practices while acquiring access to the wider culture, where they are likely to have a chance of improving their socioeconomic status and making informed decisions about the lives they wish to lead” (Ladson-Billings, 2006, p. 36). Culturally relevant pedagogues understand that students must learn to navigate between home and school, and teachers must find ways to equip students with the knowledge needed to succeed in a school system that oppresses them (Delpit, 2006; Ladson-Billings, 2006; Urrieta, 2005).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogies seek to develop socio political consciousness, which includes a teacher’s obligation to find ways for “students to recognize, understand, and critique current and social inequalities” (Ladson-Billings, 1995b, p. 476). Sociopolitical consciousness begins with teachers recognizing sociopolitical issues of race, class, and gender in themselves and understanding the causes before then incorporating these issues in their teaching.

Social Justice: Using the  classroom is site for Social Justice.

Arts: Integrating arts in the curriculum to engage students who are struggling academically.  

 All curriculum audits will be done by masters teachers who are familiar with developing proven curriculum  around Culturally Relevant Arts Education.

curriculum customization-Curriculum Customization will focus on the the 11 dimensions of Culturally Relevant Education which are:
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially and academically empowering by setting high expectations for students with a commitment to every student’s success;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are multidimensional because they engage cultural knowledge, experiences, contributions, and perspectives;
  • Culturally responsive teachers validate every student’s culture, bridging gaps between school and home through diversified instructional strategies and multicultural curricula;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially, emotionally, and politically comprehensive as they seek to educate the whole child;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are transformative of schools and societies by using students’ existing strengths to drive instruction, assessment, and curriculum design;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are emancipatory and liberating from oppressive educational practices and ideologies as they lift “the veil of presumed absolute authority from conceptions of scholarly truth typically taught in schools.” (Gay, 2010, p. 38)
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues think in terms of long-term academic achievement and not merely end-of-year tests. After later adopters of culturally relevant pedagogy began to equate student achievement with standardized test scores or scripted curricula, Ladson-Billings (2006) clarified what more accurately described her intent: “‘student learning’—what it is that students actually know and are able to do as a result of pedagogical interactions with skilled teachers” (p. 34).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues focus on cultural competence, which “refers to helping students to recognize and honor their own cultural beliefs and practices while acquiring access to the wider culture, where they are likely to have a chance of improving their socioeconomic status and making informed decisions about the lives they wish to lead” (Ladson-Billings, 2006, p. 36). Culturally relevant pedagogues understand that students must learn to navigate between home and school, and teachers must find ways to equip students with the knowledge needed to succeed in a school system that oppresses them (Delpit, 2006; Ladson-Billings, 2006; Urrieta, 2005).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogies seek to develop socio political consciousness, which includes a teacher’s obligation to find ways for “students to recognize, understand, and critique current and social inequalities” (Ladson-Billings, 1995b, p. 476). Sociopolitical consciousness begins with teachers recognizing sociopolitical issues of race, class, and gender in themselves and understanding the causes before then incorporating these issues in their teaching.

Social Justice: Using the  classroom is site for Social Justice.

Arts: Integrating arts in the curriculum to engage students who are struggling academically.  

All customization services will facilitated by masters teachers who are familiar with the Culturally Relevant Arts Education, and proven academic and test results working with students who come from low-income neighborhoods.

 

Cost: All curriculum customization will between $18,000-65,000, depending upon scope of work. All customized curriculum services will  begin after needs assessment is completed.

Professional Development and Trainings-Professional Development and Trainings will focus on the the 11 dimension of Culturally Relevant Education which are:
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially and academically empowering by setting high expectations for students with a commitment to every student’s success;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are multidimensional because they engage cultural knowledge, experiences, contributions, and perspectives;
  • Culturally responsive teachers validate every student’s culture, bridging gaps between school and home through diversified instructional strategies and multicultural curricula;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are socially, emotionally, and politically comprehensive as they seek to educate the whole child;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are transformative of schools and societies by using students’ existing strengths to drive instruction, assessment, and curriculum design;
  • Culturally responsive teachers are emancipatory and liberating from oppressive educational practices and ideologies as they lift “the veil of presumed absolute authority from conceptions of scholarly truth typically taught in schools.” (Gay, 2010, p. 38)
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues think in terms of long-term academic achievement and not merely end-of-year tests. After later adopters of culturally relevant pedagogy began to equate student achievement with standardized test scores or scripted curricula, Ladson-Billings (2006) clarified what more accurately described her intent: “‘student learning’—what it is that students actually know and are able to do as a result of pedagogical interactions with skilled teachers” (p. 34).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogues focus on cultural competence, which “refers to helping students to recognize and honor their own cultural beliefs and practices while acquiring access to the wider culture, where they are likely to have a chance of improving their socioeconomic status and making informed decisions about the lives they wish to lead” (Ladson-Billings, 2006, p. 36). Culturally relevant pedagogues understand that students must learn to navigate between home and school, and teachers must find ways to equip students with the knowledge needed to succeed in a school system that oppresses them (Delpit, 2006; Ladson-Billings, 2006; Urrieta, 2005).
  • Culturally relevant pedagogies seek to develop socio political consciousness, which includes a teacher’s obligation to find ways for “students to recognize, understand, and critique current and social inequalities” (Ladson-Billings, 1995b, p. 476). Sociopolitical consciousness begins with teachers recognizing sociopolitical issues of race, class, and gender in themselves and understanding the causes before then incorporating these issues in their teaching.

Social Justice: Using the  classroom is site for Social Justice.

Arts: Integrating arts in the curriculum to engage students who are struggling academically.  

 All Professional Development and Training by masters teachers who are familiar with the Culturally Relevant Arts Education, and proven academic and test results working with students who come from low-income neighborhoods.

subscriptions
  • Monthly subscription service will begin at $110.62 per month, per student. Subscription service will ship month lessons plan and art activities and materials that are focused on the 11 dimension of Culturally Relevant Arts Education.

curriculum store

ANEW BAM K-5 and 6-8th grade Culturally Relevant Curriculum Art Integrated Curriculum.

Cost: Licensing Fee is $295 per student, per subject for a academic year. Subject include Math, Science and English Language.